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Real innocent sex

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Real innocent sex

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Real innocent sex

Real innocent sex

The book explains how the sexual revolution could have occurred in a nation so deeply imbued with Christian ethical values. In contrast to this, Rees argues for the acceptance of responsibility for the sinful exclusions that make possible finding the meaning of embodied personal identity through marriage between any two persons. He reveals the sexual messages of mainstream Protestant theology and the religious aspirations of medical texts found at the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research. This work also engages theological readings of nineteenth-century fiction and literary readings of contemporary theological writings. In this new edition, a new conclusion explores how popular music, gay liberation, and recovery from sexual abuse have substantially expanded innocent ecstasy during the past thirty years while continuing the Christian themes of redemption and mission. In a critique that is at once humorous and unrelenting, Geoffrey Rees argues that sexual desire is fundamentally a desire to make sense of oneself as a whole person. Rees's book demonstrates how, when it comes to same-sex relations, the personal is deeply political and innocence is overrated. With Augustine and Foucault as guides, he crosses disciplinary boundaries between theology, philosophy, literature, and history with audacity and ease. While detailing the development of moral obligations to pursue sexual pleasure and to follow certain patterns of sexual practice, Gardella incidentally provides one of the few books to bring together the liberal Protestant, Roman Catholic, and evangelical perspectives on any aspect of American culture. Selected pages. Through a constructive engagement with the writings of Saint Augustine on original sin, Rees turns on its head the conventional wisdom regarding the goodness of sexual relationship, arguing that sin, not innocence, is the starting point in pursing justice in sexual ethics. Tracing our strange journey from the hands of Jonathan Edward's angry Puritan God to the loving embrace of Marabel Morgan's Total Woman, Gardella draws his surprising evidence from widely disparate sources, ranging from Catholic confessionals to methodist revival meetings, from evangelical romances to The Song of Bernadette. Here is a new religious ethics which generates a radically innovative conversation on the nature of original sin, death, and pleasure. Selected pages. Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. John Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham, inventors of corn flakes and Graham crackers, who devised their products as anti-aphrodisiacs. Gardella attributes the American ethic of sexual pleasure to the eagerness of Americans to overcome original sin. The result, he maintains, is an attitude that looks to sex for what was once expected from religion. In so doing Rees shows that debates about same-sex marriage are so compelling because the participants are all telling a common story in which they seek to establish the innocence of their own preferred forms of self-understanding as defined against some other persons' sinful selves. From the polling place to the pulpit, The Romance of Innocent Sexuality investigates the passions that are enacted in debates about same-sex marriage. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. For most of Western history people have not had such expectations. To that end Rees boldly reclaims the wisdom of the most disreputable teachings of the Augustinian tradition: This led to a quest for perfection, or complete freedom from guilt, combined with a quest for ecstatic experience. Geoffrey Rees teaches health care ethics in the Department of Religion, Health, and Human Values at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, where he also serves on the ethics consultation service. Real innocent sex



Selected pages. In this new edition, a new conclusion explores how popular music, gay liberation, and recovery from sexual abuse have substantially expanded innocent ecstasy during the past thirty years while continuing the Christian themes of redemption and mission. Rees's book demonstrates how, when it comes to same-sex relations, the personal is deeply political and innocence is overrated. In contrast to this, Rees argues for the acceptance of responsibility for the sinful exclusions that make possible finding the meaning of embodied personal identity through marriage between any two persons. John Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham, inventors of corn flakes and Graham crackers, who devised their products as anti-aphrodisiacs. While detailing the development of moral obligations to pursue sexual pleasure and to follow certain patterns of sexual practice, Gardella incidentally provides one of the few books to bring together the liberal Protestant, Roman Catholic, and evangelical perspectives on any aspect of American culture. Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. Through a constructive engagement with the writings of Saint Augustine on original sin, Rees turns on its head the conventional wisdom regarding the goodness of sexual relationship, arguing that sin, not innocence, is the starting point in pursing justice in sexual ethics. Gardella attributes the American ethic of sexual pleasure to the eagerness of Americans to overcome original sin. From the polling place to the pulpit, The Romance of Innocent Sexuality investigates the passions that are enacted in debates about same-sex marriage. This work also engages theological readings of nineteenth-century fiction and literary readings of contemporary theological writings. Geoffrey Rees teaches health care ethics in the Department of Religion, Health, and Human Values at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, where he also serves on the ethics consultation service. To that end Rees boldly reclaims the wisdom of the most disreputable teachings of the Augustinian tradition: This led to a quest for perfection, or complete freedom from guilt, combined with a quest for ecstatic experience. For most of Western history people have not had such expectations. The book explains how the sexual revolution could have occurred in a nation so deeply imbued with Christian ethical values. With Augustine and Foucault as guides, he crosses disciplinary boundaries between theology, philosophy, literature, and history with audacity and ease. The result, he maintains, is an attitude that looks to sex for what was once expected from religion. Selected pages. In so doing Rees shows that debates about same-sex marriage are so compelling because the participants are all telling a common story in which they seek to establish the innocence of their own preferred forms of self-understanding as defined against some other persons' sinful selves. Here is a new religious ethics which generates a radically innovative conversation on the nature of original sin, death, and pleasure. In a critique that is at once humorous and unrelenting, Geoffrey Rees argues that sexual desire is fundamentally a desire to make sense of oneself as a whole person.

Real innocent sex



The result, he maintains, is an attitude that looks to sex for what was once expected from religion. While detailing the development of moral obligations to pursue sexual pleasure and to follow certain patterns of sexual practice, Gardella incidentally provides one of the few books to bring together the liberal Protestant, Roman Catholic, and evangelical perspectives on any aspect of American culture. In contrast to this, Rees argues for the acceptance of responsibility for the sinful exclusions that make possible finding the meaning of embodied personal identity through marriage between any two persons. Here is a new religious ethics which generates a radically innovative conversation on the nature of original sin, death, and pleasure. From the polling place to the pulpit, The Romance of Innocent Sexuality investigates the passions that are enacted in debates about same-sex marriage. For most of Western history people have not had such expectations. He reveals the sexual messages of mainstream Protestant theology and the religious aspirations of medical texts found at the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research. John Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham, inventors of corn flakes and Graham crackers, who devised their products as anti-aphrodisiacs. Tracing our strange journey from the hands of Jonathan Edward's angry Puritan God to the loving embrace of Marabel Morgan's Total Woman, Gardella draws his surprising evidence from widely disparate sources, ranging from Catholic confessionals to methodist revival meetings, from evangelical romances to The Song of Bernadette. Selected pages. The book explains how the sexual revolution could have occurred in a nation so deeply imbued with Christian ethical values. Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. In a critique that is at once humorous and unrelenting, Geoffrey Rees argues that sexual desire is fundamentally a desire to make sense of oneself as a whole person. This work also engages theological readings of nineteenth-century fiction and literary readings of contemporary theological writings. Through a constructive engagement with the writings of Saint Augustine on original sin, Rees turns on its head the conventional wisdom regarding the goodness of sexual relationship, arguing that sin, not innocence, is the starting point in pursing justice in sexual ethics. With Augustine and Foucault as guides, he crosses disciplinary boundaries between theology, philosophy, literature, and history with audacity and ease. In so doing Rees shows that debates about same-sex marriage are so compelling because the participants are all telling a common story in which they seek to establish the innocence of their own preferred forms of self-understanding as defined against some other persons' sinful selves. This led to a quest for perfection, or complete freedom from guilt, combined with a quest for ecstatic experience. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. Gardella attributes the American ethic of sexual pleasure to the eagerness of Americans to overcome original sin. Geoffrey Rees teaches health care ethics in the Department of Religion, Health, and Human Values at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, where he also serves on the ethics consultation service. Rees's book demonstrates how, when it comes to same-sex relations, the personal is deeply political and innocence is overrated. Selected pages. To that end Rees boldly reclaims the wisdom of the most disreputable teachings of the Augustinian tradition: In this new edition, a new conclusion explores how popular music, gay liberation, and recovery from sexual abuse have substantially expanded innocent ecstasy during the past thirty years while continuing the Christian themes of redemption and mission.



































Real innocent sex



While detailing the development of moral obligations to pursue sexual pleasure and to follow certain patterns of sexual practice, Gardella incidentally provides one of the few books to bring together the liberal Protestant, Roman Catholic, and evangelical perspectives on any aspect of American culture. With Augustine and Foucault as guides, he crosses disciplinary boundaries between theology, philosophy, literature, and history with audacity and ease. In so doing Rees shows that debates about same-sex marriage are so compelling because the participants are all telling a common story in which they seek to establish the innocence of their own preferred forms of self-understanding as defined against some other persons' sinful selves. Selected pages. Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. Here is a new religious ethics which generates a radically innovative conversation on the nature of original sin, death, and pleasure. In this new edition, a new conclusion explores how popular music, gay liberation, and recovery from sexual abuse have substantially expanded innocent ecstasy during the past thirty years while continuing the Christian themes of redemption and mission. The result, he maintains, is an attitude that looks to sex for what was once expected from religion. From the polling place to the pulpit, The Romance of Innocent Sexuality investigates the passions that are enacted in debates about same-sex marriage. Tracing our strange journey from the hands of Jonathan Edward's angry Puritan God to the loving embrace of Marabel Morgan's Total Woman, Gardella draws his surprising evidence from widely disparate sources, ranging from Catholic confessionals to methodist revival meetings, from evangelical romances to The Song of Bernadette. This work also engages theological readings of nineteenth-century fiction and literary readings of contemporary theological writings. In a critique that is at once humorous and unrelenting, Geoffrey Rees argues that sexual desire is fundamentally a desire to make sense of oneself as a whole person. To that end Rees boldly reclaims the wisdom of the most disreputable teachings of the Augustinian tradition: In contrast to this, Rees argues for the acceptance of responsibility for the sinful exclusions that make possible finding the meaning of embodied personal identity through marriage between any two persons. Gardella attributes the American ethic of sexual pleasure to the eagerness of Americans to overcome original sin. This led to a quest for perfection, or complete freedom from guilt, combined with a quest for ecstatic experience. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. Rees's book demonstrates how, when it comes to same-sex relations, the personal is deeply political and innocence is overrated.

Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. Tracing our strange journey from the hands of Jonathan Edward's angry Puritan God to the loving embrace of Marabel Morgan's Total Woman, Gardella draws his surprising evidence from widely disparate sources, ranging from Catholic confessionals to methodist revival meetings, from evangelical romances to The Song of Bernadette. For most of Western history people have not had such expectations. Geoffrey Rees teaches health care ethics in the Department of Religion, Health, and Human Values at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, where he also serves on the ethics consultation service. This led to a quest for perfection, or complete freedom from guilt, combined with a quest for ecstatic experience. From the polling place to the pulpit, The Romance of Innocent Sexuality investigates the passions that are enacted in debates about same-sex marriage. To that end Rees boldly reclaims the wisdom of the most disreputable teachings of the Augustinian tradition: With Augustine and Foucault as guides, he crosses disciplinary boundaries between theology, philosophy, literature, and history with audacity and ease. In contrast to this, Rees argues for the acceptance of responsibility for the sinful exclusions that make possible finding the meaning of embodied personal identity through marriage between any two persons. Gardella attributes the American ethic of sexual pleasure to the eagerness of Americans to overcome original sin. In so doing Rees shows that debates about same-sex marriage are so compelling because the participants are all telling a common story in which they seek to establish the innocence of their own preferred forms of self-understanding as defined against some other persons' sinful selves. In a critique that is at once humorous and unrelenting, Geoffrey Rees argues that sexual desire is fundamentally a desire to make sense of oneself as a whole person. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. Rees's book demonstrates how, when it comes to same-sex relations, the personal is deeply political and innocence is overrated. The book explains how the sexual revolution could have occurred in a nation so deeply imbued with Christian ethical values. Here is a new religious ethics which generates a radically innovative conversation on the nature of original sin, death, and pleasure. Through a constructive engagement with the writings of Saint Augustine on original sin, Rees turns on its head the conventional wisdom regarding the goodness of sexual relationship, arguing that sin, not innocence, is the starting point in pursing justice in sexual ethics. This work also engages theological readings of nineteenth-century fiction and literary readings of contemporary theological writings. The result, he maintains, is an attitude that looks to sex for what was once expected from religion. In this new edition, a new conclusion explores how popular music, gay liberation, and recovery from sexual abuse have substantially expanded innocent ecstasy during the past thirty years while continuing the Christian themes of redemption and mission. He reveals the sexual messages of mainstream Protestant theology and the religious aspirations of medical texts found at the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research. While detailing the development of moral obligations to pursue sexual pleasure and to follow certain patterns of sexual practice, Gardella incidentally provides one of the few books to bring together the liberal Protestant, Roman Catholic, and evangelical perspectives on any aspect of American culture. Selected pages. John Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham, inventors of corn flakes and Graham crackers, who devised their products as anti-aphrodisiacs. Selected pages. Real innocent sex



Geoffrey Rees teaches health care ethics in the Department of Religion, Health, and Human Values at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, where he also serves on the ethics consultation service. John Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham, inventors of corn flakes and Graham crackers, who devised their products as anti-aphrodisiacs. In contrast to this, Rees argues for the acceptance of responsibility for the sinful exclusions that make possible finding the meaning of embodied personal identity through marriage between any two persons. Rees's book demonstrates how, when it comes to same-sex relations, the personal is deeply political and innocence is overrated. Through a constructive engagement with the writings of Saint Augustine on original sin, Rees turns on its head the conventional wisdom regarding the goodness of sexual relationship, arguing that sin, not innocence, is the starting point in pursing justice in sexual ethics. This led to a quest for perfection, or complete freedom from guilt, combined with a quest for ecstatic experience. To that end Rees boldly reclaims the wisdom of the most disreputable teachings of the Augustinian tradition: In so doing Rees shows that debates about same-sex marriage are so compelling because the participants are all telling a common story in which they seek to establish the innocence of their own preferred forms of self-understanding as defined against some other persons' sinful selves. In this new edition, a new conclusion explores how popular music, gay liberation, and recovery from sexual abuse have substantially expanded innocent ecstasy during the past thirty years while continuing the Christian themes of redemption and mission. He reveals the sexual messages of mainstream Protestant theology and the religious aspirations of medical texts found at the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research. The result, he maintains, is an attitude that looks to sex for what was once expected from religion. Here is a new religious ethics which generates a radically innovative conversation on the nature of original sin, death, and pleasure. The book explains how the sexual revolution could have occurred in a nation so deeply imbued with Christian ethical values. Selected pages. For most of Western history people have not had such expectations. From the polling place to the pulpit, The Romance of Innocent Sexuality investigates the passions that are enacted in debates about same-sex marriage. Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. Gardella attributes the American ethic of sexual pleasure to the eagerness of Americans to overcome original sin. Tracing our strange journey from the hands of Jonathan Edward's angry Puritan God to the loving embrace of Marabel Morgan's Total Woman, Gardella draws his surprising evidence from widely disparate sources, ranging from Catholic confessionals to methodist revival meetings, from evangelical romances to The Song of Bernadette. Selected pages. In a critique that is at once humorous and unrelenting, Geoffrey Rees argues that sexual desire is fundamentally a desire to make sense of oneself as a whole person. With Augustine and Foucault as guides, he crosses disciplinary boundaries between theology, philosophy, literature, and history with audacity and ease.

Real innocent sex



With Augustine and Foucault as guides, he crosses disciplinary boundaries between theology, philosophy, literature, and history with audacity and ease. John Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham, inventors of corn flakes and Graham crackers, who devised their products as anti-aphrodisiacs. Gardella attributes the American ethic of sexual pleasure to the eagerness of Americans to overcome original sin. While detailing the development of moral obligations to pursue sexual pleasure and to follow certain patterns of sexual practice, Gardella incidentally provides one of the few books to bring together the liberal Protestant, Roman Catholic, and evangelical perspectives on any aspect of American culture. In contrast to this, Rees argues for the acceptance of responsibility for the sinful exclusions that make possible finding the meaning of embodied personal identity through marriage between any two persons. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. To that end Rees boldly reclaims the wisdom of the most disreputable teachings of the Augustinian tradition: The result, he maintains, is an attitude that looks to sex for what was once expected from religion. This led to a quest for perfection, or complete freedom from guilt, combined with a quest for ecstatic experience. In this new edition, a new conclusion explores how popular music, gay liberation, and recovery from sexual abuse have substantially expanded innocent ecstasy during the past thirty years while continuing the Christian themes of redemption and mission. Selected pages. In so doing Rees shows that debates about same-sex marriage are so compelling because the participants are all telling a common story in which they seek to establish the innocence of their own preferred forms of self-understanding as defined against some other persons' sinful selves. In a critique that is at once humorous and unrelenting, Geoffrey Rees argues that sexual desire is fundamentally a desire to make sense of oneself as a whole person. Geoffrey Rees teaches health care ethics in the Department of Religion, Health, and Human Values at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, where he also serves on the ethics consultation service. For most of Western history people have not had such expectations. Selected pages. Through a constructive engagement with the writings of Saint Augustine on original sin, Rees turns on its head the conventional wisdom regarding the goodness of sexual relationship, arguing that sin, not innocence, is the starting point in pursing justice in sexual ethics. He reveals the sexual messages of mainstream Protestant theology and the religious aspirations of medical texts found at the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research. The book explains how the sexual revolution could have occurred in a nation so deeply imbued with Christian ethical values.

Real innocent sex



Selected pages. This led to a quest for perfection, or complete freedom from guilt, combined with a quest for ecstatic experience. For most of Western history people have not had such expectations. Geoffrey Rees teaches health care ethics in the Department of Religion, Health, and Human Values at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, where he also serves on the ethics consultation service. In this new edition, a new conclusion explores how popular music, gay liberation, and recovery from sexual abuse have substantially expanded innocent ecstasy during the past thirty years while continuing the Christian themes of redemption and mission. He reveals the sexual messages of mainstream Protestant theology and the religious aspirations of medical texts found at the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research. Here is a new religious ethics which generates a radically innovative conversation on the nature of original sin, death, and pleasure. Tracing our strange journey from the hands of Jonathan Edward's angry Puritan God to the loving embrace of Marabel Morgan's Total Woman, Gardella draws his surprising evidence from widely disparate sources, ranging from Catholic confessionals to methodist revival meetings, from evangelical romances to The Song of Bernadette. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. Gardella attributes the American ethic of sexual pleasure to the eagerness of Americans to overcome original sin. Rees's book demonstrates how, when it comes to same-sex relations, the personal is deeply political and innocence is overrated. Through a constructive engagement with the writings of Saint Augustine on original sin, Rees turns on its head the conventional wisdom regarding the goodness of sexual relationship, arguing that sin, not innocence, is the starting point in pursing justice in sexual ethics. John Harvey Kellogg and Sylvester Graham, inventors of corn flakes and Graham crackers, who devised their products as anti-aphrodisiacs. In so doing Rees shows that debates about same-sex marriage are so compelling because the participants are all telling a common story in which they seek to establish the innocence of their own preferred forms of self-understanding as defined against some other persons' sinful selves. The book explains how the sexual revolution could have occurred in a nation so deeply imbued with Christian ethical values. The result, he maintains, is an attitude that looks to sex for what was once expected from religion. In contrast to this, Rees argues for the acceptance of responsibility for the sinful exclusions that make possible finding the meaning of embodied personal identity through marriage between any two persons. This work also engages theological readings of nineteenth-century fiction and literary readings of contemporary theological writings. Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. From the polling place to the pulpit, The Romance of Innocent Sexuality investigates the passions that are enacted in debates about same-sex marriage. With Augustine and Foucault as guides, he crosses disciplinary boundaries between theology, philosophy, literature, and history with audacity and ease. While detailing the development of moral obligations to pursue sexual pleasure and to follow certain patterns of sexual practice, Gardella incidentally provides one of the few books to bring together the liberal Protestant, Roman Catholic, and evangelical perspectives on any aspect of American culture.

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3 thoughts on “Real innocent sex

  1. Innocent Ecstasy shows how Christianity led Americans to hope for so much from sex. Selected pages. Geoffrey Rees teaches health care ethics in the Department of Religion, Health, and Human Values at Rush University in Chicago, Illinois, where he also serves on the ethics consultation service.

  2. This work also engages theological readings of nineteenth-century fiction and literary readings of contemporary theological writings.

  3. Tackling sensitive and controversial material head on, Rees's tone is sober and serene. For most of Western history people have not had such expectations. While detailing the development of moral obligations to pursue sexual pleasure and to follow certain patterns of sexual practice, Gardella incidentally provides one of the few books to bring together the liberal Protestant, Roman Catholic, and evangelical perspectives on any aspect of American culture.

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